Difference between revisions of "LuxCoreRender Cameras"

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(Created page with "LuxRender supports three different camera types. The differences between the camera types and the available settings are explained below. Image:CameraTypes.png|frame|left|pe...")
 
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LuxRender supports three different camera types. The differences between the camera types and the available settings are explained below.
 
[[Image:CameraTypes.png|frame|left|perspective, orthographic and environment camera]]
 
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===Perspective Camera===
 
The perspective camera is a camera type that is similar to cameras in most 3d packages: it does create a perspective image out of a three dimensional scene, but it does not aim to represent the imperfections and distortions that lenses of photo cameras typically create.
 
  
====Field of View====
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==Perspective Camera==
The value for field of view indicates the angle between the camera and the leftmost and rightmost visible points in the scene (or the top- and bottommost points, if the image is vertical). The exporter normally gets this information from the selected camera in the scene, but the value can be overridden.
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The perspective camera is a camera type that is similar to cameras in most 3D packages: it creates a perspective image out of a three dimensional scene.
  
[[Image:Fov.png|frame|left|view angles of 70, 40 and 20 degrees]]
 
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====Depth of Field: lens radius, f-stop, focus distance, and light distribution====
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'''Field of View'''
Depth of field indicates how sharp (infinite depth of field) or blurred (shallow depth of field) objects that are not in focus appear.  For the perspective camera in LuxBlend, this is defined by the "lens radius" which calculates aperture diameter, or the ''f-stop'' value, f-stop being 1/focal length, thus larger f-values will result in a smaller aperture diameter and thus deeper depth of filed. The default lens radius value (0) calculates at infinite f-stop, and thus an image where everything is in focus. Larger lens radius values result in a more shallow depth of field.
 
  
The alternative method (and only one available in LuxBlend25) is to define an f-stop value in the camera tab (This is the method used on real cameras). With f-stop, smaller numbers create a more shallow depth of field.
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The value for field of view indicates the angle between the camera and the leftmost and rightmost visible points in the scene (or the top- and bottommost points, if the image is vertical). The exporter normally gets this information from the selected camera in the scene, but the value can be overridden.
  
Focus distance is the distance between the imaginary plane in the scene that will be in focus and the camera imaging plane.  You can either use an object or a distance to set the focus distance. An easy way to use this feature in Blender is to create an Empty object, place it where you want the camera to focus and select it in Depth of Field box.
 
  
[[Image:Lens radius demo.jpg|600 px|thumb|left|Various lens radius settings, from left to right: 0, .05, .1<br />Note that for the different examples, the focus distance is the green sphere in the front.  As the lens radius increases, the background becomes more blurry.  Lens radius setting is not currently available in LuxBlend25]]
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'''Depth of Field'''
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[[Image:DOF demo.jpg|600 px|thumb|left|Various f-stop settings, from left to right: .5, 1.5, and 4<br />Note that for the different examples, the focus distance is the green sphere in the front.  As the F-stop is increased the background objects become more in focus]]
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Depth of field indicates how sharp or blurred objects that are not in focus will appear. In LuxCoreRender this works in the same way as a real camera, by setting the f-stop value. A smaller f-stop creates a more shallow(blurred) depth of field.
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LuxRender also allows for some modifications to the distribution of light across the focus disk or [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circle_of_confusion circle of confusion]. The distribution and quality of this light is generally called [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bokeh bokeh]. This is achieved through the blade number and distribution parameters. Blade number is the number of blades that make up the iris of a lens. A blade number of zero simulates an infinite blade number of a perfect circle, and will result in bokeh disks that are circular. Almost all lenses, when wide open, have their blades concealed behind a circular disk in the lens, and thus are circular, but at any other f-stop, the light traveling through the lens is exposed to the blades, and their number and shape will be revealed by the shape of the bokeh disks in the image. More expensive lenses traditionally have more blades, eight or more, while cheaper lenses average six. As no lens distributes light uniformly across the focus disk, some non-uniformity is desirable for photorealistic imaging. Refer to the images below for a starting point for these parameters.
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Focus distance is the distance between the camera and the focal point, the point in the scene that will be in focus. You can either use an object or a distance to set the focus distance. An easy way to use this feature is to create an Empty object, and use that as focal point. You can use any mesh object but keep in mind that it's the object ''origin'' that will mark the focal point, and that is not necessarily on the surface of the object.
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<!-- Bokeh Not supported yet in luxcore
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LuxCoreRender allows for some modifications to the distribution of light across the focus disk or [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circle_of_confusion circle of confusion]. The distribution and quality of this light is generally called [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bokeh bokeh]. This is achieved through the blade number and distribution parameters. Blade number is the number of blades that make up the iris of a lens. A blade number of zero simulates an infinite blade number of a perfect circle, and will result in bokeh disks that are circular. Almost all lenses, when wide open, have their blades concealed behind a circular disk in the lens, and thus are circular, but at any other f-stop, the light traveling through the lens is exposed to the blades, and their number and shape will be revealed by the shape of the bokeh disks in the image. More expensive lenses traditionally have more blades, eight or more, while cheaper lenses average six. As no lens distributes light uniformly across the focus disk, some non-uniformity is desirable for photo-realistic imaging. Refer to the images below for a starting point for these parameters. -->
  
[[Image:Camera_Uniform_Bokeh_Power_0_10_100.png|900 px|thumb|left|Uniform depth of field light distribution across the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bokeh bokeh] disk at power settings of 0, 10, and 100, with a six bladed iris.<br />Note that the power setting has little or no effect on the uniform distribution parameter, remaining uniform.]]
 
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[[Image:Camera_Exponential_Bokeh_Power_0_1_10.png|900 px|thumb|left|Exponential depth of field light distribution across the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bokeh bokeh] disk at power settings of 0, 1, and 10, with a six bladed iris.<br />Note that at the power setting of 0 the lens closely mimics the light distribution of a [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catadioptric_system catadioptric lens].]]
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'''Shutter'''
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[[Image:Camera_Inverse_Exponential_Bokeh_Power_0_1_10.png|900 px|thumb|left|Inverse Exponential depth of field light distribution across the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bokeh bokeh] disk at power settings of 0, 1, and 10, with a six bladed iris.<br />Note that this is simply the inverse of the exponential setting, and that higher power settings closely mimic a [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catadioptric_system catadioptric lens].]]
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The shutteropen and shutterclose entries in the .lxs file are typically used for [[Motion Blur]].
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[[Image:Camera_Gaussian_Bokeh_Power_0_1_10.png|900 px|thumb|left|Gaussian depth of field light distribution across the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bokeh bokeh] disk at power settings of 0, 1, and 10, with a six bladed iris.<br />Note that the power setting has little or no effect on the non-uniform distribution of light across the bokeh disk.]]
 
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[[Image:Camera_Inverse_Gaussian_Bokeh_Power_0_1_10.png|900 px|thumb|left|Inverse Gaussian depth of field light distribution across the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bokeh bokeh] disk at power settings of 0, 1, and 10, with a six bladed iris.<br />Note that the power setting has little or no effect on this no-uniform distribution of light across the bokeh disk.]]
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'''Lens Shift'''
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====Shutter====
 
The shutteropen and shutterclose entries in the .lxs file are typically used for [[Motion Blur]].
 
  
====Lens Shift====
 
 
A [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_correction_lens shift lens] is a lens that can move the position of the horizon up or down without introducing perspective distortion in the vertical direction. Amongst others, this can be useful for architectural perspectives where most of the subject is above the horizon.
 
A [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_correction_lens shift lens] is a lens that can move the position of the horizon up or down without introducing perspective distortion in the vertical direction. Amongst others, this can be useful for architectural perspectives where most of the subject is above the horizon.
  
 
The unit of measurement for lens shift is the size (either horizontal or vertical, depending which of the two is biggest) of the image. For example, using a horizontal value of 0.5 will result in an image whose left edge is straight in front of the camera.
 
The unit of measurement for lens shift is the size (either horizontal or vertical, depending which of the two is biggest) of the image. For example, using a horizontal value of 0.5 will result in an image whose left edge is straight in front of the camera.
  
[[Image:ShiftLens.png|frame|left|a normal perspective view from a horizontal camera; the same view with the camera tilted vertically; the same view using lens shift instead of camera tilt]]
 
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====Clipping====
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'''Clipping'''
Camera clipping hides part of the scene, based on the distance to the camera plane. There are two settings, ''Start'' and ''End''. When Start is set to 0 and End to a value bigger than the size of the model, everything will be visible.
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The geometry that is hidden by the camera clipping is still taken into account for the lighting calculations.
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Camera clipping hides part of the scene, based on the distance to the camera. The two settings, ''Start'' and ''End'' mark the visible area. Anything outside will be invisible to the camera. The geometry that is hidden by the clipping is still taken into account for the lighting calculations.
[[Image:CameraClipping.jpg|frame|left|no camera clipping; ''start'' set to 30; ''end'' set to 50]]
 
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===Orthographic Camera===
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==Orthographic Camera==
 
The orthographic camera creates an orthographic projection of the scene. This can be used to create straight projections (like a top view or a frontal view) and [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axonometric_projection axonometric projections].
 
The orthographic camera creates an orthographic projection of the scene. This can be used to create straight projections (like a top view or a frontal view) and [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axonometric_projection axonometric projections].
  
[[Image:OrthographicCamera.jpg|frame|left|a camera that is looking in a horizontal or vertical direction creates a projection, a tilted camera creates an axonometric view]]
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'''Scale'''
====Scale====
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The scale value sets the scale of the view. The scale number indicates how many model units fit in image. For example, at a scale of one, one model unit will fit exactly in the width of the image (or the height, in case the height is bigger than the width) and at a scale of one hundred, one hundred model units will fit in the image.
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The scale number indicates how many model units fit in image. For example, at a scale of one, one model unit will fit exactly in the width of the image (or the height, in case the height is bigger).
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====Clipping / Depth of Field / Focus Distance / Shutter / Lens Shift====
 
====Clipping / Depth of Field / Focus Distance / Shutter / Lens Shift====

Revision as of 11:19, 27 December 2017

Perspective Camera

The perspective camera is a camera type that is similar to cameras in most 3D packages: it creates a perspective image out of a three dimensional scene.


Field of View

The value for field of view indicates the angle between the camera and the leftmost and rightmost visible points in the scene (or the top- and bottommost points, if the image is vertical). The exporter normally gets this information from the selected camera in the scene, but the value can be overridden.


Depth of Field

Depth of field indicates how sharp or blurred objects that are not in focus will appear. In LuxCoreRender this works in the same way as a real camera, by setting the f-stop value. A smaller f-stop creates a more shallow(blurred) depth of field.

Focus distance is the distance between the camera and the focal point, the point in the scene that will be in focus. You can either use an object or a distance to set the focus distance. An easy way to use this feature is to create an Empty object, and use that as focal point. You can use any mesh object but keep in mind that it's the object origin that will mark the focal point, and that is not necessarily on the surface of the object.


Shutter

The shutteropen and shutterclose entries in the .lxs file are typically used for Motion Blur.


Lens Shift

A shift lens is a lens that can move the position of the horizon up or down without introducing perspective distortion in the vertical direction. Amongst others, this can be useful for architectural perspectives where most of the subject is above the horizon.

The unit of measurement for lens shift is the size (either horizontal or vertical, depending which of the two is biggest) of the image. For example, using a horizontal value of 0.5 will result in an image whose left edge is straight in front of the camera.


Clipping

Camera clipping hides part of the scene, based on the distance to the camera. The two settings, Start and End mark the visible area. Anything outside will be invisible to the camera. The geometry that is hidden by the clipping is still taken into account for the lighting calculations.


Orthographic Camera

The orthographic camera creates an orthographic projection of the scene. This can be used to create straight projections (like a top view or a frontal view) and axonometric projections.


Scale

The scale number indicates how many model units fit in image. For example, at a scale of one, one model unit will fit exactly in the width of the image (or the height, in case the height is bigger).


Clipping / Depth of Field / Focus Distance / Shutter / Lens Shift

These settings work the same way as the perspective camera settings.

Environment Camera

The environment camera creates a 360 degree image from the current camera position. If the camera is completely horizontal, this results in a panoramic image. Amongst others, this can be used to create high dynamic range environment images for image based lighting.

File:Environmentcamera.jpg
rendering generated with an environment camera


Clipping / Focus Distance / Shutter

These settings work the same way as the perspective camera settings.